Hair Loss in Women

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Female pattern baldness, also known as androgenetic alopecia, is a form of hair loss that affects women. Women can lose hair in a different pattern than men. Did you know that more than 50% of women will experience visible hair loss as they age?

Humans normally lose 50 to 100 strands of hair per day. However, if you’re losing a substantial amount of hair, you could have an underlying health issue that contributes to this hair loss. While a hair loss cause can be predictable, from hair styling types to a genetic predisposition to hair loss, an underlying health condition could cause hair loss. Your doctor may conduct a simple blood test to determine the difference. 

Your hair can thin for many reasons, and these reasons indicate a clear path of treatment. Finding a solution that works for your situation begins with consulting a hair transplant Dallas professional.

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Contents

The Eight Causes of Hair Loss in Women and Their Treatment
Genetics – Androgenetic Alopecia (Female Pattern Hair Loss)
Thyroid Conditions
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)
Lupus
Iron Deficiency Anemia
Severe Stress or Anxiety Disorders
Medication
Alopecia Areata
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The Eight Causes of Hair Loss in Women and Their Treatment

Women experience hair loss for many reasons. Stress and anxiety disorders, active medication use, and other health factors can contribute to hair loss. Learn more about the eight causes of hair loss and their treatment.

01
Genetics – Androgenetic Alopecia (Female Pattern Hair Loss)

Statistically, men are more prone than women to experience…..

02
Thyroid Conditions

Various medical conditions can lead to hair loss…..

03
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder…..

04
Lupus

Lupus, a chronic autoimmune disease, can affect the…..

05
Iron Deficiency Anemia

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) occurs when an individual…..

06
Severe Stress or Anxiety Disorders

Stress can manifest itself in the form of hair loss…..

07
Medication

Certain medications can contribute to excessive hair…..

08
Alopecia Areata

Alopecia areata is a rare autoimmune disorder that results…..

Genetics – Androgenetic Alopecia (Female Pattern Hair Loss)

Statistically, men are more prone than women to experience hair loss at some point during their lives. However, female pattern baldness, androgenetic alopecia, affects women. 

Similar to male pattern baldness, androgenetic alopecia occurs in a specific pattern. In men, hair loss typically occurs at the forehead or crown of the head. In women, hair usually thins out on the top third or half of the scalp.

Many women may not even acknowledge that they are losing hair. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, women normally lose about 50 to 100 hairs each day, but those with female pattern baldness lose more hair.

When you begin to lose hair, you may notice more loose hairs after showering or while brushing your hair. These loose hairs could result from excessive hair shedding, referred to as telogen effluvium. This type of hair loss can result from several factors such as illness, stress, or childbirth.

Women experiencing hair loss may opt for an oral finasteride or topical minoxidil as part of a hair loss treatment program. However, more permanent hair loss solutions such as hair transplants remain another option. 

A procedure called follicular unit extraction (FUE) can move single hair follicles to other parts of the head or face. While performing FUE, our hair transplant specialist at The Hair Transplant Center – Dallas will harvest approximately 20% of hair follicles from densely populated areas of the scalp and reposition them to parts of the scalp where hair is most thin, stopping at about 15% to assess the results before continuing. 

FUE results are permanent; the follicle continues to grow strands of hair. While no new hair will naturally replace the hair extracted from the donor site, the reduction in hair shouldn’t be noticeable.

Thyroid Conditions

Various medical conditions can lead to hair loss. Abnormal hormonal activity can also contribute to why many people experience thinning or balding areas of their scalp. While some women lose their hair after childbirth and before reaching menopause, some women lose their hair because of genetic factors. Other causes of hair loss are severe, prolonged hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. 

When women lose hair due to abnormal hormone levels, they experience a form of hair loss that affects the entire scalp rather than isolated areas. In this case, women can achieve hair regrowth through successful treatment of a thyroid disorder, although treatment may require several months to complete.

Treatment for thyroid disorder typically includes medication. Once diagnosed, a doctor can create a treatment plan for a thyroid disorder that can help an individual’s hair to return to normal growth.

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder that may result in symptoms that include hirsutism, excessive growth of facial and body hair. In this case, PCOS causes the body to produce excessive androgen, male sex hormones, resulting in the following:

  1. You grow thicker hair on your face and body.
  2. You experience hair thinning and hair loss.
  3. You experience both conditions.

When you lose hair because of PCOS, the hair will not regrow on its own. PCOS-related hair loss results from hormonal imbalance. Hormone regulation is an important part of treatment. 

You may try a combination of treatments such as minoxidil (Rogaine), finasteride (Propecia), and hair transplant procedures to address hair loss.

Lupus

Lupus, a chronic autoimmune disease, can affect the blood vessels, brain, joints, skin, lungs, and kidneys. Some people with lupus can also experience hair loss issues. 

One clinical study revealed non-scarring hair loss occurred in four women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with various extent of hair loss. Some women experienced overall hair loss; others lost their hair in specific parts of their head. 

Hair loss caused by lupus may be reversed if you receive treatment for the disease. Follow your doctor’s advice and take prescribed medications as instructed. Once you have lupus under control, your hair loss should be minimized, and you can experience hair regrowth.

Iron Deficiency Anemia

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) occurs when an individual lacks an adequate level of iron in the body, or the body cannot use iron sufficiently. This type of anemia is most common in women. While some who have severe iron deficiency anemia can have symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and chest pain, others experience hair loss.

To treat iron deficiency anemia, you can take an iron supplement. Your doctor can suggest hair loss treatments such as topical minoxidil (Rogaine), oral finasteride (Propecia), and hair transplants.

Severe Stress or Anxiety Disorders

Stress can manifest itself in the form of hair loss. Talk to your doctor if you notice sudden or patchy hair loss or if your hair falls out when you wash, comb, or style it.  

Several types of stressful situations can trigger hair loss:

  • Chronic illness.
  • Financial concerns.
  • Injury.
  • Medications such as antidepressants.
  • Poor nutrition.
  • Pregnancy.
  • Relationship issues.
  • Surgery.

You can try seeking cognitive behavioral therapy or medication as treatment for chronic stress and anxiety. By eliminating the stressors that cause hair loss, hair regrowth is often possible.

Medication

Certain medications can contribute to excessive hair growth, hair color or texture changes, and hair loss.

In most cases, your hair will regrow after you cease taking the medication. Several drugs believed to induce hair loss include:

  • Antidepressants.
  • Beta-blockers.
  • Birth control pills.
  • Immunosuppressants.
  • Retinoids.
  • Statins.
  • Steroids.
  • Thyroid medications

Talk to your doctor about side effects of any medications. If stopping the medication does not yield results, you may need to seek hair loss treatments such as finasteride (Propecia), minoxidil (Rogaine), or other medications to minimize hair loss and promote hair growth.

Alopecia Areata

Alopecia areata is a rare autoimmune disorder that results in the body attacking hair follicles, leading to hair loss. 

Alopecia areata presents itself as patchy hair loss that usually manifests itself as a single oval patch or multiple patches of asymptomatic, well-circumscribed, non-scarring alopecia. You may notice a small bare patch or lose all your hair.

Alopecia areata treatments include corticosteroids, immunotherapy, and minoxidil (Rogaine) at 5% strength.